I love puff pastry.  It has the ability to make an appetizer, main course or dessert seem extra special.  I had gotten into the habit of buying my puff pastry because I have made traditional French puff pastry in the past and it is a bit of a chore.  So much so that I gave myself permission to buy the pre-made stuff from the market (I don’t give myself permission to do that easily).  Why?  Mostly because i’m a fussy pain in the butt.  I also have gotten so accustomed to making everything from scratch that I actually feel a sense of guilt when I buy a pre-made product for my own convenience.  I think it is possible I am a little hard on myself.  I also know that at this point the odds of that changing are not stellar.  So I do try to find a better way when possible to make things from scratch that are “less” of a chore.  This recipe for quick puff pastry is one of those ways.

I have mentioned in the past that I am an avid (obsessed) book collector.  I own hundreds of them and don’t foresee adding to my collection slowing down in the near future. Not because I am trying to be wasteful, but because I learn from reading.  I learned so many of my home keeping/homesteading/urban farming skills from books.  That said, I often look over my many shelves of books searching for new ideas.  I am embarrassed to admit have several books I have never cooked or baked from.  I always mean to, but life is hectic and I push things off waiting for that calm moment when I can leisurely select recipes from the pile I have marked with post-its and slips of paper I use as bookmarks.  If you go through my books I have so many interesting recipes marked, so many projects and crafts I honestly mean to get to….and I will.  But probably not today and tomorrow does not look good either….

Anyway, every once in a while I steal a moment for myself to indulge in a recipe or project that really looked interesting to me.  I put them on my to do list (sometimes for weeks).  This recipe was one such recipe (it didn’t seem like I would ever stop yapping and get to the recipe…i’m so sorry, I’m a Mommy and starved for adult conversation….you guys are my friends….I wait all day to talk to you all).

This makes a really good substitute for the real deal fancy French puff pastry.  It is not at all hard to make and yes, it it worth the time it does take.  This recipe is adapted from Bake by Nick Malgieri page 50-52.  Lets make some puff pastry shall we?

Quick Puff Pastry

This recipe makes about 1 1/2 pounds of dough

10 ounces (2 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter very very cold

2 cups all purpose flour (spoon in to the dry measure and level off)

3/4 teaspoon salt

2/3 cup cold water

Storage: This dough keeps well in the fridge for up to 5 days.  Double wrap the dough and you can freeze it for 1 month.

Here we go...

1. Cut 2 sticks of the butter into 1/4 inch cubes.  Scrape them onto a plate and put them in the fridge.

Very cold cuber butter

2. Put the flour and salt in the bowl of your food processor and pulse to mix.  Cut the remaining butter (4 tablespoons) into slivers and add to the work bowl of the processor.  Combine until no visible butter remains.

The dry ingredients

Slivered butter added to the dry ingredients

butter no longer visible

3. Add the chilled butter cubes and give three 1-second pulses.  Add half the water and pulse once.  Add the remaining water and pulse twice.  The dough will not form a ball.  Remove the blade carefully.

Very cold butter cubes added

The water has been added

4. Scrape the dough from the bowl onto a floured surface and then lightly flour the top of the dough.  Use your hands to squeeze and shape the dough into a cylinder, and then press down on the dough to flatten it into a rectangle.

The rough dough out of the food processor

 

Dough worked gently into a cylinder

Dough flattened into a rectangle (gently)

5. Flour the surface and the dough, and starting at the narrow end of the rectangle farthest from you, use a rolling pin to press the dough firmly in parallel strokes close to each other.  If there are sticky pieces of butter on the surface of the dough, seal them with a large pinch of flour, making sure to clean off anything stuck to the rolling pin before continuing.  Repeat the pressing motion again from close to farther narrow end of the dough.

Starting to roll

6. Press the dough once along the width; it should  be a rectangle about 1/2 inch thick.  Once again, flour under and on top of the dough and roll the dough away and back toward you in the length and once in the width, without rolling over he ends in the same direction, to make a rectangle about 18 inches long and 8 inches wide.

Rolled out to 18x8

7. Fold the two 8 inch ends of the dough in toward the middle of the rectangle.  Leaving a 1 inch space in the middle.  Fold the bottom up to the top to form 4 layers of dough.  Reposition the dough so that the folded edge that resembles the spine of a book is on your left.  Rolling and folding the dough is known as giving the dough a turn.

 

Beginning the folds

4 layers single turn

 

Repeat steps 5, 6,  and 7.

Repeat steps 5. 6. and 7 again.

After all the folds are complete.

Wrap the dough and refrigerate  for at least 3 hours to firm up and rest its elasticity before attempting to use it.

Ready to rest

 

When the dough is fully rested and chilled its ready to use in any way you would like.  I cut this dough in half to show you the layers…

Many layers, full of buttery goodness!!!!!!

This dough is wonderful wrapped around a small wheel of brie and topped with brown sugar and walnuts and an hors d’ oeuvre.  Or topping off a bowl of stew to create a pot pie of sorts.  Perhaps wrapped around a chicken breast stuffed with sun dried tomatoes and fontina cheese served with a lemon white wine sauce…..Wrapped around a seared filet mignon topped with sautéed mushrooms with a brandy sauce….or something as simple as palmier cookies or as the crust to a crisp apple tart….its good stuff to have around.  Make some, you will be glad you did.

Enjoy!

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30 Responses to Homemade Puff Pastry ~ the quicker version by Nick Malgieri

  1. [...] few days ago I made some homemade puff pastry, if you missed that post you can find it here.  Now full disclosure….traditionally these cookies are made with REAL puff pastry not this [...]

  2. I’ve been looking for an easy puff pastry dough recipe for ages! I can’t buy the store stuff because there is only one brand where I live and it just tastes…strange. So great to have an easy recipe now. Pinned!

  3. Puff pastry is so delicious, what a great recipe! I can’t wait to make it myself

    • Tamatha says:

      Traditional puff pastry is such a huge job to make (I find it fun but a chore none the less). This recipe takes so much of that work out of the deal, with great results!

  4. petey says:

    this looks good. I LOVE puff pastry and will definitely have to try this!

  5. Lisa says:

    This is amazing! I love puff pastry, but the time to make it is daunting. I can’t wait to try this one, it looks so much easier :) Thank you so much for stopping by Mix it up Monday and sharing, I hope you’ll stop by often!

  6. Karyn says:

    Wow! This seems so simple! I will have to try this out sometime. I’m pinning it for future reference. Thanks for linking up to What Makes You Say Mmmmm?!

  7. I can’t wait to try this. I’ve made croissants before so the rolling technique is the same but I love that this will take me less than an hour where as the croissants took 12 hours! Will be trying this soon! Pinned.

  8. Wonderwoman says:

    Hey – I think I can do this! Recipes for puff pastry seem WAY too complicated, but this seems doable. Thanks for sharing and for your visual lesson.

  9. I have used a quick puff pastry recipe before, but it only called for the traditional tri-fold business letter style, but I’ll have to give that four layer technique a try. It seems like it would cut back on time for sure!

  10. Oh my goodness! I have made puffed pastry only once. I was so much work! I promised never to make it again. But I may have to go back on that promise and try this recipe!
    Looks wonderful! I am so happy to find you!
    Yvonne

    • Tamatha says:

      This recipe is so easy you will be very pleased. I love making homemade pastry and do so often but french puff pastry is a real chore. I love this!

  11. chuck says:

    After the dough has chilled do you use It like any other dough..1/8 inch bottom and top pie crust ? I wanted to make pot pie’s..with very flaky crust…thanks

    • Tamatha says:

      I don’t care for puff pastry as a bottom crust to be honest. I love it as the top on a pot pie. I actually would recommend pate brisee as your bottom crust. It holds so much better. I think you will prefer that dough. I have a recipe posted on this site. It’s a good one. Good luck.

  12. Andrea says:

    I found your site looking for a puff pastry dough to use to make cream cheese danish for my seven year old. I’m trying to do a “no store bought, all homemade” thing at home for my kids’ health and because I like to cook/bake. I completely agree that I feel guilty buying premade anything at this point which is why I’m making him the danish (it’s his favorite and he’s sick). It’s in the fridge right now. Thanks for the recipe and I totally agree with needing adult conversation!

  13. Sana says:

    Hi I was trying to make this recipe but I use 1.25 cups of butter n that was not chilled so when I put butter n flour in mixer they were so soft like I have kneaded thm with water haven’t put any water what to do now

  14. Fran says:

    How exactly do you roll out the dough when using it.. Do you flatten I and roll pressing down the layers

  15. Fran says:

    How exactly do you roll out the dough when using it.. Do you flatten and roll pressing down the layers

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